1. Travel
Send to a Friend via Email

Tanzania Travel Tips -- What You Need To Know Before You Go

Tanzania Visas, Health, Safety and When to Go

By

Maasai herding their cattle in the mixed use part of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania

Maasai herding their cattle

© Erika Bloom
These Tanzania travel tips will help you plan your trip to Tanzania. This page has information about visas, health, safety and when to go.

Page 2 has information about Tanzanian currency and getting to Tanzania including air, rail, boat and bus options.

Page 3 covers transport within Tanzania and has information about getting around by air, land and sea.

Visas

Citizens of the UK, the US, Canada, Australia, and most countries in the EU, need a tourist visa to enter Tanzania. Application details and forms can be found on Tanzanian Embassy web sites. US citizens can apply here. Tanzanian embassies issue single ($50) and double ($100) entry visas (handy if you're planning to cross over to Kenya or Malawi for a few days). They do not issue visas for more than two entries.

Tanzanian tourist visas are valid for 6 months from the date of issue. So while planning ahead for visas is a good thing, make sure the visa is still valid for the length of time you plan to travel in Tanzania.

You can obtain a visa at all airports in Tanzania as well as at the border crossings, but it is advised to get a visa beforehand. In order to get a visa you have to have proof that you plan to leave Tanzania within 3 months of your arrival.

As with all visa matters -- contact your local Tanzanian Embassy for the latest information.

Health and Immunizations

Immunizations

No immunizations are required by law to enter Tanzania if you are travelling directly from Europe or the US. If you are travelling from a country where Yellow Fever is present you will need to prove you have had the inoculation.

Several vaccinations are highly recommended when traveling to Tanzania, they include:

  • Yellow Fever
  • Typhoid
  • Hepatitis A
  • Diptheria

It is also recommended that you are up to date with your polio and tetanus vaccinations. Rabies is also prevalent and if you're planning to spend a lot of time in Tanzania, it may be worth getting the rabies shots before you go.

Contact a travel clinic at least 3 months before you plan to travel. Here's a list of travel clinics for US residents.

More on vaccinations for travelers to Africa ...

Malaria

There's a risk of catching malaria pretty much everywhere you travel in Tanzania. While it's true that areas of high altitude like the Ngorongoro Conservation Area are relatively malaria-free, you will usually be passing through areas where malaria is prevalent in order to get there.

Tanzania is home to the chloroquine-resistant strain of malaria as well as several others. Make sure your doctor or travel clinic knows you are traveling to Tanzania (don't just say Africa) so s/he can prescribe the right anti-malarial medication. Tips on how to avoid malaria will also help.

Safety

Tanzanians are well known for their friendly, laid-back attitude. In most cases you will be humbled by their hospitality despite the fact that most people are a lot poorer than you. As you travel in the touristy areas, you will probably attract your fair share of souvenir hawkers and beggars. Remember that these are poor people who are trying to earn money to feed their families. If you aren't interested then say so, but try and remain polite.

Basic Safety Rules for Travelers to Tanzania

  • Make a copy of your passport and keep it in your luggage.
  • Don't walk on your own at night in the major cities or on empty beaches especially in Pemba and Zanzibar.
  • Don't wear jewelry.
  • Don't carry too much cash with you.
  • Wear a money belt that fits under your clothes.
  • Don't carry a lot of camera equipment especially in the major cities.
  • Beware of thieves posing as police officers.

Roads

Roads in Tanzania are pretty bad. Potholes, road blocks, goats and people tend to get in the way of vehicles and the rainy season completely wipes out half the country's roads. Avoid driving a car or riding a bus at night because that's when most accidents happen. If you are renting a car, keep the doors and windows locked while driving in the major cities. Car-jackings occur fairly regularly but may not end in violence as long as you comply with demands made.

Terrorism

In 1998 a terrorist attack on the US Embassy in Dar es Salaam left 11 dead and 86 injured. The US, UK and Australian governments are all warning that more attacks may occur specifically in Zanzibar and/or Dar es Salaam. Vigilance is required, but there's no need to avoid visiting these places -- people are still visiting New York and London after all.

For more information on terrorism check with your Foreign Office or Department of State for the latest warnings and developments.

When to Go to Tanzania

The rainy seasons in Tanzania are from March to May and November to December. Roads become washed out and some parks even have to close. But, the rainy season is the perfect time to get good deals on safaris and enjoy a quieter experience without the crowds.

Tanzania Travel Tips Page Two: Currency and Getting To Tanzania.

Tanzania Travel Tips Page Three: Getting Around Tanzania.

  1. About.com
  2. Travel
  3. Africa Travel
  4. Tanzania
  5. Tanzania Travel Tips - Tanzania Travel Information, Visas, Transport, Weather, Immunizations, Safety

©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.